LESSON 4.6
Write the Old Section

Starting everything we do with a plan helps keep us from making mistakes and doing things over.

A Simple Plan for the Old Section

A simple plan for the Old Section can consist of two parts—

Old Section

Example – snakes in the zoo
Other info – snakes in Australia

Write a First Sentence of the Old Section

The first sentence of the Old Section must—

  • Contain the word I
  • Have a word that shows emotion
  • Be short and simple, so readers can adjust to the act of reading
  • Not refer to the New Section or Why Section

You might start like this:

I have been interested in poisonous animals for a long time.

Include an Example

I have been interested in poisonous animals for a long time. For example, whenever my family goes to the zoo, I am fascinated as I watch deadly snakes move around their cages or just lie on a branch or rock, sleeping or staring off into space. I always wonder what goes through their minds. Do they know they are some of the most badass creatures ever created? 

Make Sure a Sentence Follows For Example

Incorrect:
I have been interested in poisonous animals for a long time. For example, snakes and lizards.

Correct:
I have been interested in poisonous animals for a long time. For example, when my family goes to the zoo, I am fascinated as I watch deadly snakes move around their cages or just lie on a branch or rock, sleeping or staring off into space.

Take Notes

Don’t just start writing. You might think it will save you time, but it won’t.  You will end up having to do a lot of rewriting.

Instead, take notes. Make it like a shopping list. Don’t write sentences.

Some sleeping
SD Zoo
Badass
Staring off

Finish the Example

Some examples will be short. Others will be long. Whichever the case, give readers enough information that they can “see” what you are talking about.

I have been interested in poisonous animals for a long time. For example, when my family goes to the zoo, I am fascinated as I watch deadly snakes move around their cages or just lie on a branch or rock, sleeping or staring off into space.. I always wonder what goes through their minds. Do they know they are some of the most badass creatures ever created?

Research with Wikipedia

Trying to write without information is impossible. Take time to look things up. Use Wikipedia. Some teachers say that using Wikipedia isn’t allowed, but that’s not true. Wikipedia is great to help you get started. Professional writers use it all the time.

Don’t write sentences. Continue with your shopping list.

Australia

eastern and western brown snakes
eastern – second deadliest
the inland and coastal taipan

Sea snakes
Urban areas

Mice

Dubois’s snake
mulga – most venom in the world.

Organize with Numbers

Use numbers to organize information and ideas.

1. Australia
2. eastern and western brown snakes
3. eastern – second deadliest
4. the inland and coastal taipan
5. Sea snakes
6. Urban areas
7. Mice
Dubois’s snake
mulga – most venom in the world

Some information will be out of order. Don’t waste time redoing the list. Instead, use decimals or letters.

1. Australia
2. eastern and western brown snakes
3. eastern – second deadliest
4. the inland and coastal taipan
5. Sea snakes
6. Urban areas
7. Mice
5.1 Dubois’s snake
4.1 mulga – most venom in the world.
1.1 160 species

Or—

1. Australia
2. eastern and western brown snakes
3. eastern – second deadliest
4. the inland and coastal taipan
5. Sea snakes
6. Urban areas
7. Mice
5a Dubois’s snake
4a mulga – most venom in the world.
1a 160 species

Put Things Together That Go Together

Check your shopping list. See if anything is out of place or could be organized better.

For example, in the above, urban areas come after sea snakes. However, sea snakes do not live in cities!

Therefore, change the numbers. Don’t move the information. Your paper will end up in a mess. Make the fewest changes possible (marked in bold).

1. Australia
2. eastern and western brown snakes
3. eastern – second deadliest
4. the inland and coastal taipan
7. Sea snakes
5. Urban areas
6. Mice
7a Dubois’s snake
4a mulga – most venom in the world.
1a 160 species

4.6.1 Task – Individual

Speaking, not writing, is the natural way we communicate. Therefore, talk the section.

  • Tell a member of your gup the Old Section. Start with the first sentence. Then use your notes, but don’t rely on them.
  • The classmate should take notes, either mentally or on paper. They should ask you questions after you talk.
  • Answer the questions you feel will help the section be clearer. If necessary, use the computer to look up information.

4.6.2 Optional Task – Individual

Write the section. KEEP YOUR SENTENCES SHORT.

Don’t worry about spelling, grammar, or paragraphing.  Those are the icing on a cake.  You cannot ice a cake until you bake it. 

I imagine that part of the reason I am interested in poisonous animals is because I live in Australia.  We have over 160 species of snakes here, including some of the deadliest snakes in the world.  Those include the eastern and western brown snakes – the eastern is the second deadliest snake in the world – the inland and coastal taipan, and the mulga, which produces the most venom of any snake in the world. What makes Australian snakes especially dangerous is that many live in urban areas or around farms. The recent invasion of mice in much of Australia has meant that many snakes have moved to where the rodents are. That has meant even more snakes in Australia’s cities and farms.  There are also poisonous sea snakes in Australian waters.  One, Dubois’s snake, is one of the three deadliest snakes in the world.  The other two live on land … in Australia.