LESSON 2.1
Why Tell Stories?
Grades 1-6

We all tell stories all the time. It’s a cool way to share things with others, just like talking in a special way. Even when you chat with your friends about what you did at recess, you’re telling a story.

Have you ever told someone about your day? Or maybe about a funny thing that happened to you? That’s storytelling. Stories can be funny, exciting, or even scary.

Today, we’re going to make a fancy story called a fantasy. The main character, the hero, can be a boy or a girl. Let’s pretend YOU are that hero! In this story, you’ll always be referred to as “I.”

The TWO Parts of a Story:

Every exciting story needs a hero (that’s YOU!) and a troublemaker.

The character can be anyone – a boy, a girl, even a silly dog! The troublemaker can be anyone or anything too, like a grumpy man, a runaway kite, an alien, or even a storm.

For now, let’s make our star a real person, just like you. 

Task 2.1.1 – Individual

Draw a barbell on a piece of paper. Use something round, like the lid of a jar, to make each barbell end.  Put I on the right circle and troublemaker on the left. What we have is like the ends of a barbell.  We can call this the “Barbell of Communication.”

Stories are a fun way to share what’s happening in our lives with others. They can be true, like what you did at school today, or made up, like a wild adventure with aliens and spaceships. Good storytellers know how to effectively communicate in a way that could make us feel happy, excited, or even a little scared.

Task 2.1.2 – Individual

Next, we will put the barbell shape into a box shape. Notice that the top row has the Barbell of Communication plus two more boxes: because and Why. Ignore those for now.

Barbell of Communication

because

Why

A Main Character

 

a Troublemaker

 

 

The Third Part of a Story

Telling someone what you did at school is ‘sharing information,’ but when you add a problem to solve, that’s what makes it a story. Stories take us on a journey with a beginning, a middle, and an end.

An exciting story usually has a problem that pops up in the middle. This problem makes things interesting. That’s how you, the hero of the story, get to jump in and use your smarts or bravery to solve it. By the end, the problem is fixed, and we learned something along the way.

 The middle box of the Communications Barbell should always have had a problem with or had a problem when in it.

Next, we add had a problem with or had a problem when. It will be the “bar” on the “barbell.” Notice that the top row has the Barbell of Communication plus two more boxes: because and Why. Ignore those for now.

Barbell of Communication

because

Why

A Main Character

had a problem with

a Troublemaker

 

 

Now we will label the parts of the barbell:

LH – this is the left-hand of the barbell.

VP – this is the “bar” on the barbell.  VP stands for verb phrase.

RH – this is the right-hand of the barbell.

Barbell of Communication

because

Why

LH

VP

RH

 

 

A Main Character

had a problem with

a Troublemaker

 

 

Task 2.1.2 – Individual

Draw and fill in the LH – VP – RH of a chart like the one above.