LESSON 1.3
Put “A” Ideas in Order

You have several “A” ideas. But which is the best? They can’t all be equally useful. How do you decide which one to use?

The answer: Use a Decision Chart.

Task 1.3.1 – Small Group

You are a cheerleading coach.  You must give the Best Cheerleader Award.  How do you choose?

You choose evaluation questions, called criteria, such as this:

    • Who is the best dancer?
    • Who is the peppiest?
    • Who has the best grades
    • Who is the friendliest
    • Who is the best at gymnastics?

Construct a chart:

Name

Best dancer

Peppiest

Highest grades

Friendliest

Best gymnastics

Total

Abbie

 

 

 

 

 

 

Betty

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carla

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darla

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emy

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are five cheerleaders, so the columns will be scored 1-5, 5 being best. 

Score from each end of the scale rather than in order. This will help eliminate arguing. For instance:

            Who is the best dancer?

            Who is the weakest dancer?

Name

Best dancer

Peppiest

Highest grades

Friendliest

Best gymnastics

Total

Abbie

 

 

 

 

 

 

Betty

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carla

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darla

1

 

 

 

 

 

Emy

5

 

 

 

 

 

Who is the second best dancer? The second weakest?

Name

Best dancer

Peppiest

Highest grades

Friendliest

Best gymnastics

Total

Abbie

4

 

 

 

 

 

Betty

3

 

 

 

 

 

Carla

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darla

1

 

 

 

 

 

Emy

5

 

 

 

 

 

Continue the back-and-forth until you fill in all the cells.  (In this case, there is only one empty cell.)

Name

Best dancer

Peppiest

Highest grades

Friendliest

Best gymnastics

Total

Abbie

4

4

1

5

4

18

Betty

3

5

3

4

2

17

Carla

2

1

4

2

1

9

Darla

1

2

5

1

5

14

Emy

5

3

2

3

3

16

Total the number. Abbie wins the award.

In case of a tie, there would be “co-captains.”  In other types of decisions, you can flip a coin where there is a tie.

Task 1.3.2 – Small Group

Take one of your A ideas from Task 1.2.2 and construct a Decision Chart.

Construct a Decision Chart:

    • Go to Home in Word.
    • Select Insert.
    • Select Insert Table
    • Select the number of rows + 1. The one is for the headings.
    • Select the number of criteria + 2. One of the two will be for the ideas. The other will be for totaling the scores.

Selecting Criteria

The criteria for making your decision will differ for each situation. Regardless of which ones you choose, they all must follow two “rules”:

    • Each must have an st (known as a superlative). For example:

Which helps the most people?

Which is the least dangerous?

Which is the least expensive?

Which is the most humane?

Which will result in the greatest (family/community/school, etc.) unity?

And so on…

    • Each must be positive, not negative.

Which will be the least expensive?  Not: Which will be the most expensive?

Idea

Helps most people

Least dangerous?

Least expensive?

Most humane?

Greatest unity?

Total